Components

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24 Component Indices

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5 Related Indices

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10 Regions

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223 Countries and Principalities

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Spotlight on Unemployment Rates

Components

Component Indices
  1. Annual deforestation (% change)
  2. Bird species, threatened
  3. Bird Species, Total
  4. CO2 emissions (metric tons per capita)
  5. Domestic general government health expenditure (% of GDP)
  6. Fish species, threatened
  7. Fish Species, Total
  8. GDP per capita (current US$)
  9. Informal employment, male (% of total non-agricultural employment)
  10. Labor force participation rate, total (% of total population ages 15-64)
  11. Literacy rate, adult total (% of people ages 15 and above)
  12. Mammal species, threatened
  13. Mammal Species, Total
  14. Mean nominal monthly earnings
  15. Minimum monthly wage ($USD PPP)
  16. Minimum Wage % of Average Wage
  17. Mortality rate attributed to household and ambient air pollution, age-standardized (per 100,000 population)
  18. Mortality rate attributed to unsafe water, unsafe sanitation and lack of hygiene (per 100,000 population)
  19. Plant species (higher), threatened
  20. Plant Species, Total
  21. Population ages 15-64 (% of total population)
  22. Population, total
  23. Self-employed, total (% of total employment)
  24. Unemployment, total (% of total labor force) 
Related Indices
  1. % of Wage Earners Low Wage
  2. Final consumption expenditure (current US$)
  3. Incarceration Rate
  4. Population ages 65 and above (% of total population)
  5. Social contributions (% of revenue)
Regions
  1. Caribbean
  2. East Asia & Pacific
  3. Europe & Central Asia
  4. European Union
  5. Latin America
  6. Middle East & North Africa
  7. North America
  8. South Asia
  9. Sub-Saharan Africa
  10. World
Countries and Principalities
  1. Afghanistan
  2. Albania
  3. Algeria
  4. American Samoa
  5. Andorra
  6. Angola
  7. Antigua and Barbuda
  8. Argentina
  9. Armenia
  10. Aruba
  11. Australia
  12. Austria
  13. Azerbaijan
  14. Bahamas
  15. Bahrain
  16. Bangladesh
  17. Barbados
  18. Belarus
  19. Belgium
  20. Belize
  21. Benin
  22. Bermuda
  23. Bhutan
  24. Bolivia
  25. Bosnia and Herzegovina
  26. Botswana
  27. Brazil
  28. British Virgin Islands
  29. Brunei Darussalam
  30. Bulgaria
  31. Burkina Faso
  32. Burundi
  33. Cabo Verde
  34. Cambodia
  35. Cameroon
  36. Canada
  37. Cape Verde
  38. Cayman Islands
  39. Central African Republic
  40. Chad
  41. Channel Islands
  42. Chile
  43. China
  44. Colombia
  45. Comoros
  46. Congo-Democratic
  47. Congo-Republic
  48. Costa Rica
  49. Cote d’Ivoire
  50. Croatia
  51. Cuba
  52. Curacao
  53. Cyprus
  54. Czech Republic
  55. Czechia
  56. Denmark
  57. Djibouti
  58. Dominica
  59. Dominican Republic
  60. East Timor (Timor-Leste)
  61. Ecuador
  62. Egypt
  63. El Salvador
  64. Equatorial Guinea
  65. Eritrea
  66. Estonia
  67. Eswatini
  68. Ethiopia
  69. Faroe Islands
  70. Fiji
  71. Finland
  72. France
  73. French Polynesia
  74. Gabon
  75. Gambia
  76. Georgia
  77. Germany
  78. Ghana
  79. Gibraltar
  80. Greece
  81. Greenland
  82. Grenada
  83. Guam
  84. Guatemala
  85. Guinea
  86. Guinea-Bissau
  87. Guyana
  88. Haiti
  89. Honduras
  90. Hong Kong SAR, China
  91. Hungary
  92. Iceland
  93. India
  94. Indonesia
  95. Iran
  96. Iraq
  97. Ireland
  98. Isle of Man
  99. Israel
  100. Italy
  101. Jamaica
  102. Japan
  103. Jordan
  104. Kazakhstan
  105. Kenya
  106. Kiribati
  107. Korea, Dem. People’s Rep.
  108. Korea, Rep.
  109. Kosovo
  110. Kuwait
  111. Kyrgyzstan
  112. Laos
  113. Latvia
  114. Lebanon
  115. Lesotho
  116. Liberia
  117. Libya
  118. Liechtenstein
  119. Lithuania
  120. Luxembourg
  121. Macao SAR, China
  122. Madagascar
  123. Malawi
  124. Malaysia
  125. Maldives
  126. Mali
  127. Malta
  128. Marshall Islands
  129. Mauritania
  130. Mauritius
  131. Mexico
  132. Micronesia, Federated States of
  133. Moldova
  134. Monaco
  135. Mongolia
  136. Montenegro
  137. Morocco
  138. Mozambique
  139. Myanmar
  140. Namibia
  141. Nauru
  142. Nepal
  143. Netherlands
  144. New Caledonia
  145. New Zealand
  146. Nicaragua
  147. Niger
  148. Nigeria
  149. North Korea
  150. North Macedonia
  151. Northern Mariana Islands
  152. Norway
  153. Oman
  154. Pakistan
  155. Palau
  156. Panama
  157. Papua New Guinea
  158. Paraguay
  159. Peru
  160. Philippines
  161. Poland
  162. Portugal
  163. Puerto Rico
  164. Qatar
  165. Romania
  166. Russian Federation
  167. Rwanda
  168. Samoa
  169. San Marino
  170. São Tomé and Príncipe
  171. Saudi Arabia
  172. Senegal
  173. Serbia
  174. Seychelles
  175. Sierra Leone
  176. Singapore
  177. Sint Maarten (Dutch part)
  178. Slovakia
  179. Slovenia
  180. Solomon Islands
  181. Somalia
  182. South Africa
  183. South Korea
  184. South Sudan
  185. Spain
  186. Sri Lanka
  187. Kitts and Nevis
  188. Lucia
  189. Martin (French part)
  190. Vincent and the Grenadines
  191. Sudan
  192. Suriname
  193. Sweden
  194. Switzerland
  195. Syrian Arab Republic
  196. Tajikistan
  197. Tanzania
  198. Thailand
  199. Timor-Leste
  200. Togo
  201. Tonga
  202. Trinidad and Tobago
  203. Tunisia
  204. Turkey
  205. Turkmenistan
  206. Turks and Caicos Islands
  207. Tuvalu
  208. Uganda
  209. Ukraine
  210. United Arab Emirates
  211. United Kingdom
  212. United States
  213. Uruguay
  214. Uzbekistan
  215. Vanuatu
  216. Venezuela
  217. Vietnam
  218. Virgin Islands, British
  219. Virgin Islands, U.S.
  220. West Bank and Gaza
  221. Yemen
  222. Zambia
  223. Zimbabwe

     About Unemployment Rates

Unemployment is an important component of GDP-a, so measurement accuracy is important. Sometimes adjustments are needed to improve the accuracy of national statistics. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) publishes a widely cited unemployment rate (called U3) that fails to account for one out of every three people who are ready and willing to work. For example, those who haven’t worked for the last four weeks are not counted in the labor force. Neither are the poor and homeless who don’t self-report, discouraged workers who have stopped looking for a job, long-term unemployed (more than four weeks), the underemployed, unemployed gig workers, and others. These groups make up 78 million people, or 24% of the U.S. population, as shown in the chart below.

BLS publishes six variations on the unemployment rate, named U1 through U6, which ranged from 1.4% to 7.6% of the official civilian workforce in 2018, with the U3 being the most widely reported. While the U3 rate, which at 3.9% for 2018 seems to fall in the middle and thereby be a trustworthy estimate, the actual rate was 14.7% (as shown in the chart below) after poor non-respondents, the homeless, the underemployed, unemployed gig workers, discouraged workers, long-term unemployed, and other capable groups are counted in the eligible labor force. It is also worth mentioning that BLS counts anybody who works more than one hour a week as employed.

The largest group of groups outside the official labor pool consists of poor people who don’t report to the BLS that they are either working or not working, perhaps because they don’t have a registered phone or a fixed address. The second largest group is underemployed gig workers. The third is discouraged workers who have stopped searching for work. The fourth is workers who haven’t filed for unemployment in the previous six weeks. Finally, prisoners for whom employment might be beneficial and/or rehabilitative are not counted, which normally might be of debatable significance except that the U.S., with the highest incarceration rate in the world, has the highest number of prisoners per capita in the world (as of 2015). The chart below shows the breakdown of uncounted labor in the official “labor force.”